Weekend Links--June 15

Tim Jenison, a Texas-based inventor, attempts to solve one of the greatest mysteries in the art world: How did Dutch master Johannes Vermeer manage to paint so photo-realistically 150 years before the invention of photography?

Did you know the neighborhood of Chelsea was named after The Chelsea Estate, built by Maj. Thomas Clarke a quarter-century before the American Revolution? Find out how other Manhattan neighborhoods got their names in this fascinating article.

 

Do you ever have trouble explaining what you do in a social situation? Here's an inspiring example of how to do it well!

 

California artist Afton Love shares a peek into her studio and practice this week on the Kind Aesthetic blog. If you happen to be in Oakland this weekend, she'll be participating in Open Studios!


Sara's Links

Lebbeus Woods, Photon Kite, from the series Centricity, 1988, Graphite on paper, 24 in. x 22 inches, Purchase through a gift of the Members of the Architecture + Design Forum, SFMOMA

Lebbeus Woods, Photon Kite, from the series Centricity, 1988, Graphite on paper, 24 in. x 22 inches, Purchase through a gift of the Members of the Architecture + Design Forum, SFMOMA

I'm so glad I made it to the Drawing Center yesterday to see the Lebbeus Woods, Architect exhibition. It closes this Sunday, and I highly recommend it!

Iced coffee is pretty much the best thing ever, but here are some tips to improve it even more.

 

Andrea's Links

A new acquaintance told me about this film, Papusza. Can't wait to see it someday. Check out this gorgeous trailer:

True story of Papusza - the first Roma woman who put her poems into writing and published them, and therefore confronted the traditional female image in the gypsy community. The film follows Papusza’s life from birth to old age: arranged marriage as a small girl, her life in a gypsy tabor before, during and after second world war, then forced settlement in communist Poland and urban life in poverty. Her meeting with the Polish poet Jerzy Ficowski, who discovered her great talent for poetry and published her works led to a tragic paradox: a famous poet was living in poverty, rejected by the Roma community, for betraying their secrets.

For some more Eastern European culture in NYC, don't miss Dakha Brakha at Brookfield's Winter Garden Monday night the 16th in downtown Manhattan. They are so amazing!

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