DELVE Networking & Events

Alex Paik- Guest Blog Post for DELVE: Collaboratives + Art

(This post was originally published on May 4, 2014.)
Today we are happy to share some thoughts from Alex Paik, artist and Director of Tiger Strikes Asteroid New York, the gracious hosts of DELVE Networking: Collaboratives + Art on May 22. During the event, Alex will be speaking about his path as well as the forming of TSA, so you are all in for an inspiring talk. Below, he writes about the ways he invigorated his own studio practice through collaboration and creating new opportunities.

Thanks for sharing with us, Alex. 

  Cube Corner 1 by Alex Paik  gouache, colored pencil, paper 20 x 11 x 3 inches 2014

Cube Corner 1 by Alex Paik
gouache, colored pencil, paper
20 x 11 x 3 inches
2014

During grad school, Alfred Leslie worked with us as one of the senior critics. He liked to say that artists are like these giants that are standing in shallow water and critics, gallerists, and art historians are like little guppies nibbling at your feet. When he first told me this I kind of rolled my eyes and thought to myself that of course Al, a 2nd generation Ab-Ex painter, would say something so macho and grandiose. But over the years I’ve found that even though his statement might not be true, taking this posture as a kind of blueprint for how much thought/worry I put into things has helped me tremendously. What critics, gallerists, and art historians think is less important to me than sustaining my studio practice and the studio practices of my friends and peers. (Ironically, as I started focusing on creating opportunities for artists to meet each other and to show, I found that gallerists and critics started noticing my work!)

For the first few years out of grad school, I was making work and trying to show. Most of my classmates had moved to NY so I felt fairly isolated in Philadelphia. It was slow going and I was frustrated by the lack of opportunities I had.

Eventually I got a few artists together and started Tiger Strikes Asteroid in Philadelphia as a way to connect artists from around the country and as a way to create my own community. What surprised me the most during that first very busy year was how inspired I was to go back into my studio. This strange thing happened where the more time I put into the gallery, the more I was driven right back into my studio. Giving other artists a slight push in their studios by offering them shows ended up also invigorating my own studio practice.

I felt empowered by the whole process of doing studio visits, planning shows, meeting with the membership, and finally seeing the work of my friends and peers at Tiger Strikes Asteroid. Even though I had less time, my productivity in the studio shot through the roof. By taking control of my “career” and by focusing on creating opportunities for myself and for my peers I started to feel more balanced in my artistic life. Of course galleries, critics, and art historians are important and have their place but sustaining my own studio practice and that of others is what I want to take up the bulk of my thought and time.

It’s easy to bash the mega-galleries, critics, and art fairs but I find that this constant negativity quickly leads to my own studio practice withering and losing my connection with other artists and their work. Do you feel like you aren’t seeing the work that you want to see in shows? Curate your own show! Start a space! Are you sick of reading reviews of James Franco's and George W. Bush’s work? Write your own reviews! Start a publication! Make your studio practice the giant in your life. Everything else is just guppies.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE: Death + Art Recap at the Morbid Anatomy Museum

It's always an inspiration to work with our neighbors in Gowanus, Brooklyn, and The Morbid Anatomy Museum was no different! Their lovely 4,200 square foot space is dedicated to the celebration and exhibition of artifacts, histories and ideas which fall between the cracks of high and low culture, death and beauty, and disciplinary divides. One can get lost in the fascinating and often hilarious objects that pepper their space.

Both Spencer Merolla and Terence Hannum shared their amazing art practices with us via  presentations in the screening room, followed by drinks and treats donated by Scotch & Honey in the main space.


Spencer, an artist working in the medium of human hair...

Terence, an artist who spends a lot of time destroying cassettes and reconfiguring their entrails into something new...

We don't think anyone left DELVE afraid of death but on the contrary, inspired to create because of it. Thanks everyone for coming!

 

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Necromancy with Magnetic Dust

We're looking forward to spending an evening at the Morbid Anatomy Museum later this month for DELVE: Death + Art, and we hope you'll join us on April 29th to hear from artists Spencer Merolla and Terence Hannum and to take a look at the curiosities on display at the museum. You can get tickets here.


Here's an essay by artist Terence Hannum, which sets the stage for the topic and gives a peek into his work.

 "Decompose" / magnetic cassette tape coating on panel / 24" diameter / 2014

"Decompose" / magnetic cassette tape coating on panel / 24" diameter / 2014

When I was twelve I started my first band. I was in a punk band and it was called Lost Image. And it was terrible. But it was fun. The four of us had a good time, and while we had a good time we would record the practices we did on a Sony tape recorder in the humid garage we practiced in. Somehow I became the holder of the band memories and had all the tapes. No one wanted them. Eventually, as I had other bands, they went from their place in my tape collection to hidden away in storage. But I still have them.

Two of the members have passed away. The original vocalist drove his car as far ashe could into the Florida Everglades and walked out into that giant wetland never to be seen again. The original bass player died in a motorcycle accident five years ago. When I want to think about them I’ll put on those cassettes we made. Something in those sounds makes me embarrassed but also makes me ache. When I feel that incision I think of Roland Barthes’ idea of the punctum from his famous writing on photography, Camera Lucida.  The punctum—that accident of the photographic detail that wounds us—can also apply to sound.  Through this act of listening I can act as a necromancer. I can communicate with the dead when I listen to the sounds I made with my friends on this tape. That buried beneath the hiss and crackle are ghosts I have access to. This is precisely because it wounds me with its technical errors.

The desire for posterity is one of the many symptoms of grief, I am thankful I held on to those horrible cassettes because I can open that wound and peer inside. The cassette was my archive of these people and our shared memory—though the medium has grown somewhat obsolescent in the dominant music culture. I’ve had the opportunity to digitize them but doing that would erode that ritual of pressing play or the scent of ancient White Out I used to coat the tape shell and scrawl our band name on it. I would no longer have to handle the yellowing j-card. There’s something there to me that honors that time.

  Phase   II  | Cassette Tape and Magnetic Cassette Tape Coating on Panel | 51" x 51" | 2014

Phase II | Cassette Tape and Magnetic Cassette Tape Coating on Panel | 51" x 51" | 2014

Obsolescence is important to me because it signifies a certain kind of death. This is a death that happens all of the time. When we get concerned with technology, one version destroys the past. One medium is better, more accurate, and another must fade away. Or be resuscitated from the brink. In my art I spend a lot of time destroying cassettes and reconfiguring their entrails into something new. I’ll collage the tape itself and adhere the tape and peel the mylar backing off to expose only the magnetic dust into a geometric mass of information. My hope is that it enhances a sense of the uncanny in its presentation of the media as a flat surface to gaze upon so we can reconsider informational time. In this reconsideration I tend to think it can draw into question the ways with which we archive, memorialize and mourn.

—Terence Hannum

Terence Hannum is a Baltimore based visual artist and musician who performs solo, with the avant-metal band Locrian (Relapse Records) and the dark synthpop duo The Holy Circle. Hannum is an Assitant Professor of Art at Stevenson University. He has had solo exhibitions at Guest Spot (Baltimore), Western Exhibitions (Chicago, IL), Stevenson University, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Gallery 400 at UIC (Chicago, IL).  And in group shows at TSA (Brooklyn, NY), sophiajacob (Baltimore, MD), Allegra La Viola (NYC), City Ice Arts (Kansas City, MO) & Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans, LA)
 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Death + Art: Our next DELVE event and the subject of several NY exhibitions!

 Adrián Villar Rojas,  The Evolution of God,  from  The Highline website, photo Timothy Schenck

Adrián Villar Rojas, The Evolution of God, from The Highline website, photo Timothy Schenck

We're looking forward to spending an evening at the Morbid Anatomy Museum later this month for DELVE: Death + Art, and as we've been researching the subject, we've stumbled across several exhibitions that are currently on view in New York City that relate to the topic. We're definitely going to check them out, and hope you find them interesting, as well! 

We also hope you'll join us on April 29th to hear from artists Spencer Merolla and Terence Hannum and to take a look at the curiosities on display at the Morbid Anatomy Museum. You can get tickets here.

In thinking about Death + Art, we are interested in how artists may transcend literal or personal experience to examine such topics as war, obsolescence, the “death” of materials through loss of function, decay or disintegration, or how death and the past can be reframed in the present to create a spectacle, an oddity, or an educational experience. It is our hope that this exploration of death will result in a new creation.

Here are some current exhibitions that grapple with these same themes:

Adrián Villar Rojas, The Evolution of God, September 21, 2014 – Summer 2015
High Line at the Rail Yards, On view daily from 7:00 AM until sunset.

"Argentine artist Adrián Villar Rojas is known for his large-scale, site-specific sculptural installations that transform their environs into a vision of their own potential future. Employing a unique mixture of cement and clay, Villar Rojas imbues his sculptures with a material destined to crumble while on view. His works combine the daunting scale of conventional public sculptures with a precarious fragility, keeping viewers mindful of the ephemerality of even the most imposing monoliths.

For the High Line, the artist presents The Evolution of God, a new, site-specific installation composed of thirteen abstract sculptures which punctuate the wild, self-seeded landscape of the High Line at the Rail Yards, and creates a sculptural progression and a rhythmic sequence of forms, reminiscent of a musical score. This new project extends the artist’s own traditional treatment of materials, by integrating organic elements such as seeds, vegetables, and other perishable components inspired by the natural landscape on the High Line as well as non-perishable items such as clothing, sneakers, and rope. Seemingly sturdy, the sculptures will instead turn into living organisms, revealing the passage of time through vegetal sprouts and tectonic cracks, which will slowly return the sculptures to the surrounding landscape."

 Kwakwaka’wakw artist.  Thunderbird Transformation Mask , 19th century. Alert Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Cedar, pigment, leather, nails, metal plate, open: 48 x 71 x 15 in. (121.9 x 180.3 x 38.1 cm), closed: 20 1/2 x 17 x 29 1/2 in. (52.1 x 43.2 x 74.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Museum Expedition 1908, Museum Collection Fund, 08.291.8902, from the Brooklyn Museum site.

Kwakwaka’wakw artist. Thunderbird Transformation Mask, 19th century. Alert Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Cedar, pigment, leather, nails, metal plate, open: 48 x 71 x 15 in. (121.9 x 180.3 x 38.1 cm), closed: 20 1/2 x 17 x 29 1/2 in. (52.1 x 43.2 x 74.9 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Museum Expedition 1908, Museum Collection Fund, 08.291.8902, from the Brooklyn Museum site.

Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas, The Brooklyn Museum, 5th Floor galleries.

"Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas presents over one hundred masterpieces from our permanent Arts of the Americas collection, exemplifying the concept of transformation as part of the spiritual beliefs and practice of the region's indigenous peoples, past and present. Themes of life, death, fertility, and regeneration are explored through pre-Columbian and historical artworks, including many pieces that are rarely on display."

Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities, November 22, 2014–May 25, 2015, Museum of Modern Art.

"In 2030, the world’s population will be a staggering eight billion people. Of these, two-thirds will live in cities. Most will be poor. With limited resources, this uneven growth will be one of the greatest challenges faced by societies across the globe. Over the next years, city authorities, urban planners and designers, economists, and many others will have to join forces to avoid major social and economic catastrophes, working together to ensure these expanding megacities will remain habitable.

To engage this international debate, Uneven Growth brings together six interdisciplinary teams of researchers and practitioners to examine new architectural possibilities for six global metropolises: Hong Kong, Istanbul, Lagos, Mumbai, New York, and Rio de Janeiro. Following the same model as the Rising Currents and Foreclosed, each team will develop proposals for a specific city in a series of workshops that occur over the course of a 14-month initiative.

Uneven Growth seeks to challenge current assumptions about the relationships between formal and informal, bottom-up and top-down urban development, and to address potential changes in the roles architects and urban designers might assume vis-à-vis the increasing inequality of current urban development. The resulting proposals, which will be presented at MoMA in November 2014, will consider how emergent forms of tactical urbanism can respond to alterations in the nature of public space, housing, mobility, spatial justice, environmental conditions, and other major issues in near-future urban contexts."

Fatal Attraction, Piotr Uklański Photographs, March 17–August 16, 2015, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

"Since emerging in the mid-1990s, the New York–based artist Piotr Uklański (born Poland, 1968) has worked with a wide variety of materials, from eye-popping collages made with pencil shavings and motley assemblages of fiber and crockery to paintings made with tie-dye or globs of brightly colored resin. This exhibition, the first to survey Uklański's photography, locates his work with the camera at the center of his artistic practice. Reveling in moribund or marginal artistic languages from a position at once ironic and sincere, the artist simultaneously subverts and pays homage to defunct modes of expression."

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE: Death + Art

This event’s theme is Death + Art.  With all of our events we curate interdisciplinary talks and performances that include a variety of artists and creatives who give presentations prior to an evening of mingling over drinks. For DELVE: Death + Art, we are interested in how artists may transcend literal or personal experience to examine such topics as war, obsolescence, the “death” of materials through loss of function, decay or disintegration, or how death and the past can be reframed in the present to create a spectacle, an oddity, or an educational experience. It is our hope that this exploration of death will result in a new creation. Through multiple platforms (the event, our blog, and social media), we will share the many ways that artists and thinkers may create a beginning from an end. We hope you can join us on this journey!

Over the next month, we will be sharing links, interviews, and guest blog posts by artists and creatives who deal with this topic in a wide variety of ways. Please be sure to follow us on social media and use the hashtag #delvedeath, if you have anything to share!

The night of the event, we have two artists who will be sharing their practice with us:

Spencer Merolla

 Spencer Merolla

Spencer Merolla

Spencer Merolla is an artist working in the medium of human hair. She has been making art as long as she can remember, beginning with obsessively coloring on the little cardboard inserts that come in packages of hosiery--and also on the walls of her childhood bedroom. Her interest in Victoriana stems from growing up in a sprawling, drafty Victorian house in Larchmont, NY and from being dragged by her mother to lectures with such scintillating titles as "Edith Wharton's Influence on Homes and Gardens."

Her recent work revisits the Victorian practice of sentimental hairwork from a contemporary perspective, investigating its emotional and performative aspects. Shifting attitudes toward mourning and death make the Victorian practice at odds with modern sensibilities, and this discordance offers an opportunity to reflect on our modern-day conventions of grief and remembrance.

She lives and works in Brooklyn.

Terence Hannum

 Terence Hannum

Terence Hannum

Terence Hannum is a Baltimore based visual artist and musician who performs solo, with the avant-metal band Locrian (Relapse Records) and the dark synthpop duo The Holy Circle. Hannum is an Assitant Professor of Art at Stevenson University. He has had solo exhibitions at Guest Spot (Baltimore), Western Exhibitions (Chicago, IL), Stevenson University, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Gallery 400 at UIC (Chicago, IL).  And in group shows at TSA (Brooklyn, NY), sophiajacob (Baltimore, MD), Allegra La Viola (NYC), City Ice Arts (Kansas City, MO) & Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans, LA).

About the venue:

The Morbid Anatomy Museum is a new 4,200 square foot non-profit institution dedicated to the celebration and exhibition of artifacts, histories and ideas which fall between the cracks of high and low culture, death and beauty, and disciplinary divides.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum hosts the kind of temporary exhibitions that very few larger museums can produce; shows both large and small, drawing on private and public collections and calling on the scholarship and expertise of the greater Morbid Anatomy community. Our permanent collection houses a research library of over 1,000 books as well as artifacts such as memorial artworks, medical moulages, wax embryological models, natural history specimens, and a variety of uncanny artworks and artifacts from around the world.

GET TICKETS HERE

RSVP ON FACEBOOK HERE

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE: Comedy + Art Recap

At DELVE: Comedy + Art on February 3rd at the Made in NY Media Center by IFP, we curated an event based on how humor, wit and irony can intersect with visual art, performance (be it theater, stand-up, improv, art performance or more), and the moving image to add levity, sarcasm and a deeper sense of awareness to the critique on our world, be it social or political.

The night started off with a wonderful presentation by artist Alex Gingrow. You can read more about her here and see her amazing guest post on our blog, but you should really check out her talk in the video below. She took us on the path of how she came to make the humorous, brave work she is making today, and the ins and outs of becoming an artist in New York City. 

Following Alex, Michael Scoggins took the floor and talked about his path as an artist making his iconic, witty, funny work. You can see more of Michael's work and read about him here, but listen to his short talk below. He reveals how he decided to stop painting and rethink his entire practice, which has led to his success today:

To end the evening, we were super excited to have Jew Noir join us, the improv duo of Roch Templeton and Jerry Mouse that pushes the boundaries of comedic and performance art by combining Meisner techniques, Improv, and studies of Zen Buddhism to startle the crowd and offer a rubber neck view of society and our place in it. They're disturbing, they're funny, they're smart, they're goofy. They're Jew Noir! They totally rocked and at the end answered some questions about their process. See below.

The wonderful crowd that joined us that night then had some drinks and got to know each other. We hope can join us for a future DELVE event! Thanks to Brooklyn Brewery and One Girl Cookies for sponsoring the evening with delicious goods! 

 

DELVE EVENTS CELEBRATE AND DISCOVER EVERYONE'S UNIQUE PATHS AS ARTISTIC AND CREATIVE FORCES. IT'S A CHANCE TO LEARN FROM OTHERS AND SEE WHERE OUR WORLDS OVERLAP. EVENTS INCLUDE PRESENTATIONS BY INSPIRING INDIVIDUALS, FOLLOWED BY DRINKS AND MEETING NEW PEOPLE. WE STRIVE TO CREATE COMMUNITY AND SHARE INFORMATION TO HELP YOU SUCCEED. DELVE EVENTS ARE FOR ANYONE INTERESTED IN LEARNING ABOUT EXCITING WORK BEING DONE IN THE
CREATIVE WORLD.

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE: Architecture + Art Recap

Back in December, we were so lucky to co-host a great DELVE event at MEx (Metropolitan Exchange) in Brooklyn with our friends, The Color Machine. You should read more about The Color Machine here. MEx is an amazing space with floors full of creativity, resourcefulness, wackiness, productivity and collaboration. It's really great to know that a co-working space like this still exists amidst all of the changes and big building going around downtown Brooklyn. 

The night kicked off with a really inspiring talk by Bill Washabaugh, who is an artist, aerospace engineer, roboticist, and designer. He is the founder and creative director of Hypersonic, a Brooklyn based collaborative design firm focusing on the creation of kinetic art and interactive installations. You can read more about him here, or better yet, watch his talk below! Bill guided us on some of the amazing projects he and his team at Hypersonic have worked on over the years, problem solving,  and the fascinating intersection at which his kinetic work exists with architecture and art. 

Following Bill, the inspiring Vasia Markides presented on the ever-fascinating, growing, and changing Famagusta EcoCity Project, a growing movement in Cyprus to transform an occupied ghost city into Europe's model Ecocity and center for peace and reconciliation. Vasia is also a filmmaker, artist and video journalist. You can read more about Vasia here and please do listen her talk below where she takes us on the wild path of the Famagusta Project that stemmed from personal motivations and has evolved into a dynamic collaboration between countries, cities, architects, designers, and more. 

The wonderful crowd that joined us that night then had some drinks, took a tour around the space with Bill and got to know each other. We hope can join us for a future DELVE event!

DELVE Events celebrate and discover everyone's unique paths as artistic and creative forces. It's a chance to learn from others and see where our worlds overlap. Events include presentations by inspiring individuals, followed by drinks and meeting new people. We strive to create community and share information to help you succeed. DELVE events are for anyone interested in learning about exciting work being done in the
creative world.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE Comedy + Art, Videos Curated by Cara Brody

If you missed our DELVE: Comedy + Art event on February 3rd at the Made in NY Media Centery by IFP in Dumbo, Brooklyn, don't fret! We have some funny stuff to share with you. 

The wonderful Cara Brody helped us out by compiling some amazing videos that reference the intersection of comedy and art. Her selection of smart and funny pieces are great to watch consecutively and dive in to thinking about how humor can be a tool for commenting on issues that artists often deal with. Enjoy!

Cara Brody is a producer and talent booker based in Brooklyn. She is currently earning a masters degree in Media Management from The New School. Her latest project, Stupid Sunday, is a new monthly comedy show at Pianos, hosted by the very loud Yoni Lotan and Mark Vigeant. 


All credit goes to Bo Burnham Watch the full show http://youtu.be/ejc5zic4q2A

A tape recorder teaches a lesson on free will. A sketch by Boat. boatcomedy.com

It's the new dance that's sweeping the nation/my brain! BUY SONG: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/ocdance-single/id921873664 Starring Rachel Bloom Directed by Paul Briganti Written by Rachel Bloom and Jack Dolgen Cinematography by E.

This is THE sketch that EVERYBODY was talking about for many years to follow. "The Andy Kaufman Incident". For those of you too young to know about this, here's a link to the Wikipedia page for 'Fridays'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSJMoH7tnvw Gonna be on Jimmy Kimmel tonight!!!! I tried making a sexy twerk video for my boyfriend and things got a little too hot :) WOW! Didn't expect all this attention. I'm fine. Just a little embarrassed!! THX!!

WUTUP DENIZENS OF THE INTERNET, NOW OVER THE PAST 2 YEARS ART THOUGHTZ HAS COVERED SOME OF THE INTELLECTUAL TRAPPINGS OF ART, BUT SELDOM DO I OFFER YOU PRAGMATIC ADVICE ABOUT REAL WORLD SCENARIOS THAT YOU WILL ENCOUNTER IN THE FEILD OF ART.

This is a rare post for me because it's a Sesame Street segment from the mid to late 90's. Although I collected tons of 70's classic segments, I recorded this one because I found it hilarious. This is the funniest "modern" Sesame Street segment I have seen!

DELVE Events celebrate and discover everyone's unique paths as artistic and creative forces. It's a chance to learn from others and see where our worlds overlap. Events include presentations by inspiring individuals, followed by drinks and meeting new people. We strive to create community and share information to help you succeed. DELVE events are for anyone interested in learning about exciting work being done in the creative world. Learn about past events here.

Want to learn more about DELVE events? Click here and get in touch if you want to host or attend one!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE: Comedy + Art, introducing Michael Scoggins

DELVE: Comedy + Art is happening on Tuesday, February 3rd! It's a curated evening of amazing artists talking about how humor affects their work, followed by drinks and meeting new people at the Made in NY Media Center in Dumbo! 

Get tickets here!** You won't want to miss this.**

We love the work of Michael Scoggins, an artist based in Brooklyn, and we are excited that he'll be sharing insight about his art practice on Tuesday. In the meantime, here is a glimpse into his work. You can see more and follow him on Tumblr here.


Artist Statement:
A page out of a notebook, with its blue lines and spiral bound edges, is a familiar image. This is my primary vehicle in utilizing a connection with the viewer.  The paper is enlarged to give this common object a sense of importance and to create a new perspective. The text and images placed upon the large page deal with the influences of American culture and how it has shaped my life.  The paper is torn, crumpled and folded to implicate a tangible history and to suggest the creation of an object, thus expanding the definition of traditional drawing.  

                                                                                                               ––Michael Scoggins

  Michael Scoggins,    Decorative Piece                                                                marker, prismacolor on paper                          30”X51”                                       2011

Michael Scoggins, Decorative Piece                                                          
marker, prismacolor on paper                       
30”X51”                                    
2011

 Michael Scoggins  Far Superior                                                                                   marker, colored pencil on paper                        35”X51”                                     2010   

Michael Scoggins
Far Superior                                                                                
marker, colored pencil on paper                      
35”X51”                                    
2010

 

 Michael Scoggins  Masterpiece  graphite, colored pencil on paper 67"X51" 2013

Michael Scoggins
Masterpiece
graphite, colored pencil on paper
67"X51"
2013

   
  
 
  
    
  
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     Michael Scoggins was born in Washington D.C in 1973 and gained an MFA in painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2006 and has attended various prestigious residencies including the   Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the MacDowell Colony, and Fountainhead.   Michael has gained international recognition and gallery representation in Atlanta, Miami, New York, San Francisco, Vienna and Seoul. His works have been added to some notable collections including, but not limited to, the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Michael has had works exhibited in over twenty solo shows, fifty curated group exhibitions, and written about in countless publications. 

Michael Scoggins was born in Washington D.C in 1973 and gained an MFA in painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2006 and has attended various prestigious residencies including the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, the MacDowell Colony, and Fountainhead. Michael has gained international recognition and gallery representation in Atlanta, Miami, New York, San Francisco, Vienna and Seoul. His works have been added to some notable collections including, but not limited to, the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Michael has had works exhibited in over twenty solo shows, fifty curated group exhibitions, and written about in countless publications. 

Get tickets to DELVE: Comedy + Art here! 2/3/15 at Made in NY Media Center by IFP.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Guest Post: Alex Gingrow

We are extremely excited to share artist Alex Gingrow's written piece about the role of comedy in her visual art below. Alex will be talking about her work on February 3rd at DELVE: Comedy + Art at Made in NY Media Center by IFP in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Get tickets here!** You won't want to miss this. 

First, check out her Artist Statement:

From 2007-2013, I worked a full time job as a mat cutter at a frame shop in midtown Manhattan. In my time there, I learned that, in the art world, the frame shop essentially functions like the neighborhood barbershop, or better yet, the red-headed step-child of an already dysfunctional family. Clients felt free to discuss their inner dealings and gallery gossip in our showroom as if none of us would or could have any regard for their lack of discretion. Over those six years, I collected nuggets of those conversations, imagined my own conversations with several of those art world powerhouses, and sought out tidbits from others who also held lowly but otherwise vital positions within galleries and institutions. At the same time, I collected numerous provenance stickers from the backs of frames and portfolios and eventually came to appropriate them with my own name, titles, and details. This became the body of work that I call The Sticker Series.

The impetus for this body of work came from one particular conversation with a client who reminded us to remove the provenance stickers from the old frames and to adhere them to the new frames because “all the money IS in the label.” My work explores both the idiocy and the irony of such a sentiment and is essentially a sharp critique of the world in which I choose to maneuver.  Like the goal of all good literature, I strive to make nuanced work that is at its core an examination of the oddities and intricacies of the human condition.

                                                                                                                       -Alex Gingrow


 Installation shot of  The Sticker Series  by Alex Gingrow

Installation shot of The Sticker Series by Alex Gingrow

Like any halfway normal person with a decent childhood and loving family, one of my biggest fears is losing a family member. I don’t like to think about it, much less talk about it. My Mama, however, is of the mindset that we have to face these things head on, discuss the details, prepare ourselves for the inevitable.  In light of this, she is constantly revising and updating her will. She was an English teacher for over 30 years and I imagine her curled up under a blanket, late at night, her dim bedside lamp glowing warmly, with the 50 some odd pages of her final document spread around her like a hurricane through paper factory and her red pen slashing through clauses and addenda with the fervor of an emergency room surgeon operating on the President himself.

She mails me a revised copy every few months with strict instructions handwritten on a post-it note to discard the old version and to put this copy in the fireproof lockbox that I don’t have. Sometimes I scan the new version to see if I can pick out what has changed. Often I can’t because it’s something as minor as an address change or the correction of a misspelled word. It pains me to read this document as it is the testament to my Mama’s eventual physical demise and absence from my life. She’s my Mama. I need her. I don’t want to think of her as ever being anything less than a phone call away.

But there is always one shining moment of dependable light at the end of her final will and testament, one article that has never and most likely will never change. My Mama doesn’t care what sort of memorial is held for her—she is leaving that decision up to me. But there are two wishes she has asked me to fill: 1. that her memorial be a party, not a service and 2. that I play Peggy Lee’s “Is That All There Is?” I have promised her that I will humbly and gladly oblige.

There is a scene in Joan Rivers’ documentary “A Piece of Work” where, after being heckled by an audience member about what he felt was an insensitive joke, Joan shoots back, “9/11!? If we didn’t laugh, where the hell would we all be? Think about that.” This is the role I feel comedy plays in my life and in my work. I want to make art and show that art and I want to do so in New York. And there are many aspects of the New York art world that froth my creative juices and inspire me to think deeper and push myself further. But there are also many components to it that I hate, despise, regret, and wish I didn’t have to be a part of. But I do. That’s how it works. So why not grab those things by the horns, face them, flip them, slap them, smack them, and eventually just learn to laugh at them? There’s not much I can do to change them, so if “that’s all there is, then let’s keep dancing. Let’s break out the booze and have a ball.” 


Born in 1979 in Knoxville, TN, Alex Gingrow has lived and studied in cities as various as Boston, MA, Savannah, GA and the small village of Dorf Tirol, in northern Italy.  In addition to her own artistic practice, she has participated in numerous panel discussions, fundraisers, speaking engagements, and as a guest artist at various performances and happenings. Her first solo show in New York City was held at Mike Weiss Gallery in September 2012 and was followed by residency appointments at the Hambidge Center in Rabun Gap, GA and at Fountainhead Residency in Miami, FL.  Gingrow has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally and has received critical reviews from publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Modern Painters, and Frieze Magazine. Gingrow currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

February 3rd, join us for DELVE: Comedy + Art at Made in NY Media Center by IFP in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Get tickets here!**

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE Interview: Dawn Luebbe

Welcome to DELVE Interviews, a look into the unique paths of artistic and creative individuals. These conversations are a branch of our DELVE Workshops and Events, where we celebrate and discover everyone's unique paths as artistic and creative forces.

**Join us for our next DELVE: Comedy + Art event on Feburary 3rd at Made in NY Media Center by IFP in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Get tickets here!**

Today we're excited to be speaking with Dawn Luebbe, an actor and comedian who recently moved to LA after 15 years in NYC. She is a regular performer at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre and has performed with sketch group Onassis at comedy festivals around the country including: San Francisco Sketchfest, Austin Out of Bounds, and New York Comedy Festival. She has appeared in comedy shorts for IFC, CollegeHumor, NickMom, and UCBComedy. Her first book, My 1992 Diary, will be published by Abrams in March of 2015. Dawn holds a BFA from NYU Tisch School of the Arts.

We can't recommend My 1992 Diary enough. It is the perfect medicine for a bad day, or any day, really. Thanks for sharing with us, Dawn!


 Actor and Comedian,  Dawn Luebbe

Actor and Comedian, Dawn Luebbe

Can you describe your path in the creative industry – from where and when you began, until now?

My foray into acting began as a preteen giantess in Nebraska. Over six feet tall and the lankiest girl in town, I was quickly cast as a variety of bird roles in our local children's theatre. From the goose in Charlotte's Web to Owl in House at Pooh Corner to the title role in Henny Penny, I really spread my wings (sorry, I couldn't resist). By the time I left Lincoln and ended up at NYU, I had only played a handful of humans, so I decided it was time to delve into serious method acting at the Lee Strasberg Institute.  After towering over my scene partners in Ibsen and Shakespeare scenes and being greeted with laughter at my portrayal of Antigone, I realized perhaps I should turn to comedy.

Around this time I was cast as a gawky bridesmaid in the Off-Broadway show Tony n' Tina's Wedding and started taking classes at Upright Citizens Brigade. For the first time, I felt totally in my element. I fell in love with improv and the ability to create characters and stories on the spot and change your behavior based on your scene partners and the audience. In both of these places I really started playing with physical comedy as well - which is still one of my favorite forms of comedy.

In 2011, I became a member of the UCB house sketch team, Onassis, with whom I still write and perform today both at UCB and elsewhere. Being a part of this sketch team has been incredibly fulfilling and allowed me to focus on what I personally am amused by and make it come to life. I love collaborating with other comedians and am lucky to have found a group of people with a similar, experimental, unique voice.

In the last year I have become more interested in comedy writing - both in sketch form and essay and storytelling forms. I started a blog in 2014, My 1992 Diary, where I posted my preteen diaries which quickly blew-up and ended up getting a book deal with Abrams coming March 24th. So the last half of 2014 was pretty much dedicated to working on the book, a previously unknown form to me which I ended up finding very fulfilling.

Who knows what the next few years will have in store? For success in comedy and acting and writing, luck and preparation seem to be the main ingredients, so all I can do is to keep working and trying new things that amuse me and hopefully something will stick.

For success in comedy and acting and writing, luck and preparation seem to be the main ingredients, so all I can do is to keep working and trying new things that amuse me and hopefully something will stick.
— Dawn Luebbe, actor and comedian

Can you describe a day, or week, in your professional life?

Every week is different depending on what projects I am working on. This week I am working on some promo videos for my book with an animator. I'm working on some pitches for Nickelodeon with my writing partner, Susannah Bohlke, and I'm preparing for a sketch show on Friday with my sketch group, Onassis at UCB (LA-Franklin). Additionally, I'm shooting a sketch for College Humor this weekend. I also discovered Trader Joe's Mediterranean hummus this week, which was maybe my biggest accomplishment.

What is your favorite project that you've worked on?

I just worked on a web series for IFC's Comedy Crib with UCB Comedy that is coming out soon. It's called "Rage" and in each episode I basically go into an angry rage over those small things in life (in NYC, in particular) that drive you crazy but you can never do anything about. It was written by Melinda Taub and directed by Julie Gomez, both of whom I think are so talented and awesome. It was so fun and exhausting to make and I am really proud of the product.

What's the most valuable lesson you've learned from managing all of your projects?

I guess it's that you can never predict how or if something will hit. I've worked on sketches that I felt so solid about and they went over horribly and other sketches that I thought were pretty mediocre have gotten huge laughs.

Also, as I've gotten older, I try not to say yes to every single opportunity that comes along. I first ask myself if this is something that I think is funny. Is this something that I care about and that shows me at my best? And if the answer is no, I move on to something more inspiring.

What advice do you often find yourself giving to the artists that you work with?

Try and do things that are thoroughly "you." How can you tell this story or portray this character with your influence instead of someone else's?

And finally, where is one of your favorite places to go to be inspired?

Dairy Queen. I love it so much.

 

**Explore and meet other chartists and creatives on February 3rd! Join us for our next DELVE: Comedy + Art event at Made in NY Media Center by IFP in Dumbo, Brooklyn. Get tickets here!**

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

DELVE Interview: Miska Draskoczy

Welcome to DELVE Interviews, a look into the unique paths of artistic and creative individuals. These conversations are a branch of our DELVE Workshops and Networking Events, where we celebrate and discover everyone's unique paths as artistic and creative forces. Join us for DELVE: Architecture + Art on Tuesday, December 9th at MEx in Brooklyn. Tickets here (before they sell out!)

Today we're excited to be speaking with Brooklyn-based photographer Miska Draskoczy. His photographic series, Gowanus Wild, is a wonderful project that we wanted to explore a bit deeper as we think about the intersection between architecture and art. 

Thanks, Miska, for sharing your insight and process with us!


  Pilot House  by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Pilot House by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

 Miska Draskoczy, photo by Siri Kaur

Miska Draskoczy, photo by Siri Kaur

Miska Draskoczy fell in love with cameras at age 14 and has been behind them ever since. His photography has been widely exhibited in the US and abroad and is the recipient of numerous awards. His urban wilderness series, Gowanus Wild, has been exhibited as a solo show at the Vermont Center for Photography and Ground Floor Gallery in Brooklyn, NY as well as in group shows such as THE FENCE at PHOTOVILLE 2013. He was recently named a Photolucida Critical Mass finalist and his work has been featured in the press by The New Yorker's Photo Booth blog, Time Out, PDN, Gizmodo, Featureshoot, Hyperallergic, Brokelyn and many others.

 

What prompted starting the project Gowanus Wild?

I live on the border of Gowanus but more importantly (as a New Yorker with a car), it's where I park. Walking home at night I was always intrigued by how empty and eerie the streets are at night. At first I just wanted to capture the mood and see what the images would look like, but as I kept shooting I realized a lot of the shots had these odd bits of nature in them and I was unconsciously shooting the way I would on a wilderness trip. So I thought this idea of an 'urban wild' was an interesting paradox to explore, especially in a place as antithetical to nature as Gowanus. More importantly this approach had a personal connection for me as someone who has always been keen on outdoors adventures. My working question became something like 'what if wilderness isn't just about the external qualities of a place, but about how we perceive or choose to experience a landscape?'  I think at a certain point I realized that the work wasn't so much a documentary but more a subjective vision of how I felt in those spaces, or how I wanted to feel; a longing, a stillness. Of course now that the neighborhood is changing so much and some of the pictures no longer exist, the series is taking on a historical dimension as well which I also find interesting.

What has the project taught or revealed to you about the changing landscape of your neighborhood?

I tended to think of change in neighborhoods as happening on a large scale; big buildings go up, others get torn down, stores open or close, etc. But what began to fascinate me was discovering how the urban environment changes on the micro level. When I looked at Gowanus with the eye of a naturalist, the way a scientist may set up a camera in the jungle and look at the same patch of dirt for months on end, the environment revealed things I might not normally have noticed. Plants of all kinds find purchase in unlikely spots and blossom, mature, then wither and lie dormant. Trash and refuse ebb and flow, collect and disperse in odd ways, and all this interacts with the built environment itself which eventually crumbles, is destroyed, and then repaired or replaced. It all has a very organic feel to it, a rhythm, that made me realize I can connect to this idea of wilderness and something bigger than myself even here in the city.

  Egret  by Miska Draskoczy,  courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Egret by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

  Debris Apron  by Miska Draskoczy,  courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Debris Apron by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

How has this project allowed you to connect in a deeper way with this community?

It's been an interesting and rewarding journey for me on this front. I started shooting this project in 2012 but had already been living in the neighborhood since 2008. Despite that length of time I didn't have any connection to the art community in Gowanus when I started, I just went about shooting things for my own little personal project. Then in 2013 as Gowanus Wild was starting to mature and go public it dawned on me that having shot all this work in Gowanus, it would probably be a good idea to reach out and connect with the local art scene here, suspecting it would be of interest. I was only dimly aware of Gowanus Open Studios at the time, but took the plunge and ran a pop-up show for it in fall 2013. It was an incredible experience as not only did I have hundreds of people come through the show, but I got connected to the Gowanus Open Studios team and began to volunteer and become involved in the art scene here. Since then, it's been such a great resource, I love having this base of a local community to be a part of. This fall I had a show for Gowanus Wild at Ground Floor Gallery in neighboring Park Slope which felt like a great way to tie it all together.

What is your favorite art making tool?

My brain, my spreadsheets, my notes. I'm a big believer that great projects have at their core unique and well conceived ideas. I spend a lot of time researching and developing ideas before and as they become projects. I'm just now moving forward with a series I've been shooting on and off for two years because it took me that long to finally find the right title. Two years to find the right two words!  It's so worth it though. Once a project starts to take off and move from the personal and private phase to the public one, I can make little course corrections but ideally I want it to be set up in a way that people can lock into it right away. Otherwise I risk doing a lot of work that may fall flat because I failed to find an effective way to communicate what I'm doing. I think of my role primarily as a communicator and I try to keep that in the forefront regardless of what medium I'm working in or whether it's personal or client work. What am I trying to convey? What will people get out of it? How can I say it more effectively? I don't think this means being literal or obvious, but having cohesion and purpose. Creativity most definitely has to come from an intuitive, unconscious place where often nothing makes sense at first, but then it gets dragged into the light and editor vs creator push and pull against each other. I'm always fascinated by this process and the challenge is often to not get stuck too much on one side of it or the other but let them dance together.

  Spring Tangle  by Miska Draskoczy,  courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Spring Tangle by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

What music/band/artist are you listening to the most right now?

I recently got the new Aphex Twin album (Syro) and have probably listened to it about a thousand times already. Then I found this obsessively long and detailed interview Richard D. James did where he goes into great detail about the techniques and gear behind making the album and his process in general. I did a lot of electronic music in college so it brought back fond memories of geeking out over analog synthesis, gear, and that fixation of going super deep into process. It's such a great feeling when I've really worked and re-worked over a piece of gear, a shooting location, color correction tools, a set of possibilities, such that it becomes encoded in my unconsciousness, I can create from this really rich space of fluency with material.  Also, with electronic music specifically I just love getting all nerdy and hopped up on math. There is something very pure and spiritual to it. I think I tend to gravitate towards abstraction and design in my photo work for similar reasons.

Where is your next dream travel destination?

Hmm… I do a lot of rock and ice climbing, so these days I fantasize mostly about great alpine climbing destinations. Top of the list for me right now is the Bugaboo range in Canada. They're these monstrous granite spires that rise up out of an endless wilderness of glaciers like some sort of jagged alien teeth. The whole place looks so otherworldly and sci-fi, and it's just crazy to think about getting to climb all up and down these things. Alpine climbing is a little bit like a religion to me. Every time I do one of these trips something big shifts in me, these experiences are so intense and unforgettable. Taking on risk and commitment and stripping down life to its barest essentials while surrounded by natural beauty with my buddies, it's just the best. The memories add so much to my life.

  Sailboat  by Miska Draskoczy,  courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Sailboat by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

  Sunflower  by Miska Draskoczy,  courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

Sunflower by Miska Draskoczy, courtesy of Tepper Takayama Fine Arts

ABOUT GOWANUS WILD: I aim to turn concepts of nature photography on their head by finding the beautiful in what most consider to be a man-made environmental catastrophe. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York is one of the most polluted waterways in America and the neighborhood has seen continuous industrial use since the 19th century. My vision is to capture a marriage of opposites; the organic in the industrial, green within blacks and grays, stillness and peace in urban chaos.  

As our urban communities grapple with how to connect with the primeval in an environment that offers sterile potted plants as an outlet to nature, I see Gowanus Wild as an urban hiking manual, a continuation of generations of landscape photography, updated for our technological age. If only we adjust our perception of what is ‘nature’ and ‘wild’ around us, a fascinating wilderness can be found in the fringes of our decaying cities where nature and chaos conspire to produce a new type of wild beauty. 
                                                                                              -Miska Draskoczy

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Meet Bill Washabaugh, DELVE: Architecture + Art Speaker 12/9!

We're really excited to hear from Bill Washabaugh on Tuesday, December 9th at DELVE: Architecture + Art at MEx in Brooklyn. (Get your tickets here to join us!) Bill is the founder and creative director of Hypersonic, a design firm focusing on the creation of kinetic art and interactive installations. Plus, in addition to be an artist and designer, he is an aerospace engineer and roboticist. 

Check out some of their projects, such as:

The Barista Bot that will draw your face on
a latte:

And the screen mechanism behind the U2 360 tour a few years back:

 Image courtesy of Hypersonic

Image courtesy of Hypersonic

SciArt in America featured Hypersonic's work this year, take a look at the article. It highlights Bill's path and current work, and we look forward to learning more in person on Tuesday. 


 Bill Washabaugh from Hypersonic

Bill Washabaugh from Hypersonic

Bill Washabaugh is an artist, aerospace engineer, roboticist, and designer. He is the founder and creative director of Hypersonic, a Brooklyn based collaborative design firm focusing on the creation of kinetic art and interactive installations.   Hypersonic’s team has a diverse background covering the fine arts and sculpture, interaction design, and engineering.  Hypersonic often collaborates with colleagues with specialties in technology, physics, mathematics, big data, biotechnology, and the fine arts to help achieve new works and unique experiences.  Bill has been a guest lecturer at RISD, NJIT, Parsons the New School, and was recently a visiting research fellow at the Cadre Institute at San Jose State University.  

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Meet Vasia Markides, DELVE: Architecture + Art Speaker on 12/9

We are very excited for you all to meet Vasia Markides, an artist, filmmaker and video journalist who will be speaking at the DELVE: Architecure + Art event on December 9th in Brooklyn. Vasia has spent the past several years founding and developing the The Famagusta Ecocity Project, a growing movement in Cyprus to transform an occupied ghost city into Europe's model Ecocity and center for peace and reconciliation. She'll be talking about her path as an artist and filmmaker on this journey at DELVE on 12/9. You definitely won't want to miss this. Please get tickets here if you haven't already!

 Varosha, photograph courtesy Vasia Markides

Varosha, photograph courtesy Vasia Markides

 Vasia Markides

Vasia Markides

Vasia took the time to answer some questions about her practice. Thanks, Vasia!

How does the built environment play into your work as an artist, film maker and video journalist?

My current body of work has everything to do with an environment that was built prior to 1970's and has been left to decay ever since. What motivated me as a storyteller was being in the presence of a place that humans long to return to but are prohibited, which has become a breeding ground for plants and animals that inhabit homes, churches, schools and hotels. This transformed environment becomes the playground in which to re-imagine the area as a living ecosystem where both humans and nature thrive in coexistence. How do we undo the mistakes of the past 40 years, in a place that has been “protected” in some ways from the concrete hysteria that has consumed the rest of the developed world? How do we create a city that is designed for people not for cars? An environment that brings the human out of the sealed, sterile box and back into the natural world, while still maintaining the comforts and conveniences of so called modern life? How do we merge the current technological era with the parts of our being that will always need fresh air, green spaces, and natural environments to thrive in?

Where else do you seek visual inspiration in addition to the all the work you have done in Cyprus?

In nature, travel to places known and unknown, films, museums, galleries, the city, books, dreams.

What are your favorite art making tools?

Camera, mics, sound recorder, computer, graphics tablet, iphone, oil paint, brushes, palette knives, pencils, pen, paper, intuition.

To get yourselves up to speed for December 9th, don't forget to watch this talk Vasia gave at TEDxLimassol that tells the fascinating story of her journey through the Famagusta project, or check out one of the many articles that has covered her project, like the BBC or CNN:

TEDxLimassol 2014 - Vasia Markides, From Ghost Town to Ecocity: A New Path to Peace New York based Founder & Director of The Famagusta Ecocity Project, a growing movement in Cyprus to transform an occupied ghost city into Europe's model Ecocity and center for peace and reconciliation.

Bio, Vasia Markides:

New York and Nicosia based Founder & Director of The Famagusta Ecocity Project, a growing movement in Cyprus to transform an occupied ghost city into Europe's model Ecocity and center for peace and reconciliation; Filmmaker, Artist and Video Journalist with a BA in Anthropology and Studio Art from Middlebury College and an MFA from Tufts University’s School of the Museum of Fine Arts; A painter originally, Vasia turned to filmmaking in 2003 when the Turkish army slackened the checkpoints separating the north and south parts of Cyprus. In 2008, she completed "Hidden in the Sand" as her Master’s thesis project, a chronicle of her mother's hometown under Turkish occupation, which now remains off limits within the six square kilometer fenced off ghost town of Varosha.  "Hidden in the Sand" has screened in venues and festivals across the U.S., Puerto Rico, Germany,  Cyprus, Turkey, and Portugal.  Co-­founder of Eleventown Productions, a New York-based video, film & animation production company working with clients such as Oxfam America, Global Nomads Group and other human rights organizations.  Recent documentary editing work includes  "Olympia Dukakis: Undefined", a biographical film on the Oscar-winning actress. After launching the Famagusta Ecocity Project and directing a documentary about the movement, her team's work gained worldwide attention through media networks that include CNN, BBC Magazine, BBC Outlook, Associated Press, Huffington Post, National Geographic, Boston Globe, ABC News, U.S. News and World Report, and more. She also recently spoke at TedX Limassol.  In addition to working on her personal projects,  she freelances as a video producer, film editor, and swimming instructor in New York City and Cyprus.  

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Meet The Color Machine: DELVE Architecture + Art Co-Hosts

We're super excited to be co-hosting the next DELVE: Architecture + Art event on Tuesday, December 9th from 7-9pm in Brooklyn with the great people at the Color Machine! Get tickets here before they sell out!

We met Jordan at one of our past events, but it turns out we both had the chance to work on the project, Rebuild By Design (RBD), in different capacities. We've included the short doc they made about RBD below so you can get a sense of the work they do. Rebuild By Design is an architecture competition created in response to Hurricane Sandy. Ten teams were chosen to create proposals that respond to rising sea levels in vulnerable areas in the Sandy region. RBD was spurred by the President’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and developed in concert with private philanthropic organizations such as The Rockefeller Foundation, MAS, and Van Alen Institute.

This is a short documentary about Rebuild By Design, an architecture competition created in response to Hurricane Sandy. Ten architectural teams were chosen to create proposals that respond to rising sea levels in vulnerable areas in the Sandy region. RBD was spurred by the President's Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force, and developed in concert with private philanthropic organizations such as The Rockefeller Foundation. This short piece tells the story of why this work is necessary and a bit about the people who do it. To learn more visit rebuildbydesign.org

About the Color Machine
When you have an idea to explain, or a feeling to express, a story to tell, a topic to explore, if there’s a product to launch or a brand to connect with people, The Color Machine uses film, video and design and a few very talented people to make that happen.

The Color Machine is full service creative and film production company, founded by Liz Regan, Jordan Alport and Raafi Rivero in Brooklyn, New York.  

 The Color Machine: Raafi Rivero, Liz Regan and Jordan Alport

The Color Machine: Raafi Rivero, Liz Regan and Jordan Alport

One of them occasionally designs clothes, or writes films, or has writing featured in the New York Times and the Huffington Post, one of them sees a record amount of live music and has travelled more on the local streets of American Music than anyone we know, one of them used Somerset, England to film a scene set in the Serengeti.

Collectively, their client list includes companies and organizations like Bugaboo, Coca-Cola, Diesel, Proctor & Gamble, HowAboutWe, NARS, McDonald’s, Discovery, HBO, Christian Dior, TED, Quicksilver, Skype, and the city of New York.

Recently they've taken an interest in short films examining urban issues for the Rockefeller Foundation, The Municipal Art Society and NYRP. Last spring, The Color Machine created The Rebuilders for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Van Alen Institute, a suite of films about unique efforts to rebuild the New York Region after Hurricane Sandy.  

Be sure to join us on December 9th to meet this creative team and hear more about what they do and see where they work!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.