Talking About What You Do

5 Keys to Marketing for Shy Artists

Many artists aren’t outgoing. Heck, many artists are introverted. We know that we are supposed to make our work and get it out into the world, but this task can be stressful. On top of this, our work can sometimes be developed from a personal place, and it’s hard to share it in a way that feels genuine and not like you are bearing your heart to the world.

Luckily, you don’t have to be the life of the party to succeed at marketing, you just have to be clear and confident in your story. Marketing for artists is a necessity to get the opportunities you want. They won’t be achieved in a vacuum.

 Artists networking at a DELVE event.

Artists networking at a DELVE event.

Here are 5 ways to overcome marketing anxiety if you have social anxiety:

  1. Get your Unique Story down pat. It’s a curated version of who you are, the one that is clear, accessible and helps you share the story behind your work, but not every personal detail. So that right there is a great way to put yourself out there in a way that is controlled but still relatable.

  2. Practice and memorize a really nice elevator pitch. This is a 1-2 sentence summary of who you are and what you do. Just memorize it so it sounds natural and conversational– not like a robot.

  3. Make sure your website is amazing. This is one of your biggest assets. Even if you have terrible social anxiety when talking about your work (most of us do!!!), then your website will speak volumes for your amazing work and professional acumen.

  4. Assure your visuals and documentation are gorgeous. Go back to the last point. This is a must for artists of any temperament, but especially important for people who will do a lot of their marketing online.

  5. Get really good at one social media platform. You can build a solid community of friends and supporters online. If you dedicate yourself to sharing your work and unique story on Instagram, for example, you will be marketing your work in an inspiring way without ever having to speak to anyone!!

Do you want more inspiring and practical advice like this sent straight to you? Sign up for our weekly newsletter. You’ll get weekly mission to improve your focus and practice. Don’t miss out!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Personal branding isn't as scary as you think.

As an artist or creative entrepreneur who deals with making work that is close to your heart, incredibly intuitive and part of how you simply are as a human being, it can feel impossible to translate your work into words and marketing efforts that mean something real, that make an impact on the people that matter, and that feel right to you.

As a small business owner—artists and creative entrepreneurs, that’s you—you may be unsure of your personal brand. You may be thinking, “Do I even need one? ‘Brand’ sounds like a word that only corporate companies use.” 

But you do have a serious business: your work. And you do indeed have a personal brand, it already exists within you.

That's why we created a free guide for you to get clear on your own personal brand once and for all. It's way easier than you think; it starts with putting your visuals into words and thinking about why you are unique.

Define your personal brand in 3 steps will walk you through it, and it only takes 30 minutes. To get this free guide, just fill out the form below!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

5 steps for effectively telling your story to potential clients

You are the only ______ (fill in the blank: freelancer, artist, designer, singer...) in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way.

So how do you let your potential clients know who you are and what you do in a way that feels powerful and genuine? How do you recount your professional history, products and services in a compelling way when your work isn’t there to visually speak for you?

 

 

 

 

 

Here are five tips for telling your UNIQUE story:

1. Carve out the time to get it right

You need to set aside time for yourself to craft your unique story. Take a look at your schedule and determine when you most like to write and feel self-reflective. Over morning coffee? At night after a day’s work? On the weekend?

Make it count! Schedule a few hours in your calendar and show up. This is a very important meeting you have with yourself.

2. Reflect on why you are awesome

It doesn’t matter if you hate writing, despise thinking about yourself, loathe self-promotion, and would rather crawl in a hole. Now is the time to pat yourself on the back a bit, reflect on all of the amazing things you have been doing and think about why you are so awesome.

Let’s get started. Answer the questions below honestly and with as many descriptive words as possible in a free-form style. Don’t worry about spelling mistakes or coherent thoughts, just write and avoid jargon. Be yourself. No one is reading this except for you.

  • What do you do? What does your work look like? (If you make visual or physical products, get down into the nitty-gritty and describe one of your most successful projects or pieces in great detail. If you offer services, write out the exact steps you take on a project from beginning to end with an ideal client.)
  • How do you do it? (List the cold, hard facts about how you do what you do. Take nothing for granted. For the makers: how much time does it take, what kind of materials do you use, what does it look like in space? And if you offer services: how much time does it take, what is your approach and attitude, where do you do it? What are the results that people get from you?)
  • How did you arrive at this kind of work? (What is your applicable personal and professional history that has led you down this unique path? What inspired you to start doing this? Go back in time and think about the days before freelancing, or that amazing project that launched you.)
  • Who are you as a creative professional and how do you want to be defined? (As a creative, you might wear many hats, but only state the thing that you want to be known for by your ideal clients.)

OK, you’re done! Save your writing and get ready to move on with your day.

But first, schedule a time tomorrow to review this. It should only take about 30-45 minutes. Do it. Show up. Don’t wait until next week!

3. What nice things have other people said about you?

So you currently have a giant document full of information about your work that applies only to you. These notes provide the actual words that reflect your very own personal and professional history that drive your creativity and passion for what you create.

Next, you need to remember the nice and amazing things that clients have said about you and your work.

Write from memory, and if you have some great testimonials kicking around then copy them into this doc.

4. Show why you care

You’re more than just your work.

Your career path and personality make you unique, so just describing yourself as a “designer” won’t help you get new clients. Tell us exactly what you design, why, what it means to you, and how you got there. Give your clients something to care about and remember.

With that frame in mind, review your notes and take the first stab at writing your unique story as if you were telling the story to someone who loves what you do. Don’t bore them, engage them.

Set your timer for one hour.

First, clearly state what you do and the services you offer. Tell us why your services are unique and how and why you do them. Next, reflect on any interesting tidbits of your professional path or applicable personal details that make you stand out from others in your field. And finally, what are the amazing results that clients get from working with you?

Sleep on this first draft, take a day or two, and better yet, engage the help of a friend and schedule in your next meeting to whittle this beast down to a manageable statement that you can use on your website and other marketing materials. It will also translate beautifully to how you talk about what you do.

You’re close. We know you can see the light.

5. Keep refining

The goal for the next sixty minutes is to finish editing your draft down into a manageable professional story that is engaging, genuine, and all you. The goal is to have one to two concise and powerful paragraphs that are malleable enough to share on your website, use in your marketing efforts and feel proud of.

Spoiler alert: this step really isn’t the last, since your unique story will be ever-evolving and changing as you do. Roll with it and come back to these questions often when you feel a shift in your work or when you know that you have something wonderful to add.

How do you tell your story? Let us know!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Make people remember you with an effective introduction

Have you ever felt tongue-tied when asked to introduce yourself and describe your work? Or maybe you ramble on in a way that doesn’t accurately describe what you do?

As a creative who does so many amazing things, it might be incredibly difficult to put your work into words in order to give your audience that “aha” moment and make them want to learn more.

There are many occasions where you’ll be asked to describe your work – or answer that dreaded question: what do you do? These include interviews, parties, networking get-togethers, conferences, or even meeting a friend of a friend for the first time.

The goal? You want the right people to remember you.

There are ways to practice talking about your services and talents that will open doors and engage the people you are talking with in an exciting way.

First, you need to remember: You are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way. We want to help you make sure you tell the right story when people ask, in a clear, succinct, and compelling way.

First, let’s explore an example:

We met an artist at an opening. She had recently moved to New York from Florida, so we were discussing that, since it's a big life move. Sarah, our new acquaintance, impressed us when we asked her, "What kind of work do you make?" And she answered, "I am a sculptor who makes works from recycled materials, especially those small plastic bags that newspapers are delivered in."

Immediately, we were intrigued, asked her more questions about her work, and made it a point to look at her website the next day. Had she just said, "I am a sculptor" the conversation might have drifted off to more social things, or perhaps ended. So, the point here is to be very specific because each and every one of us is incredibly unique.

Make someone remember you. How do you do that? Create your perfect elevator pitch in five easy steps:

1. Say what you do: I am a______________________________. (designer, writer, illustrator, programmer, etc)

2. Now write down the three most important things that you do as a (designer, writer, illustrator, programmer, etc) and cite proof points why your work is important or unique.

3. Now figure out: What do you want your work to accomplish/What is your goal?

4. Distill the above three points into a short sentence or two: this will become your introduction, or pitch. You’ll want to end up with a simple statement like: I am a _____________ who (does this unique thing.)

5. Remember, you are talking with someone else, so engage them. Hopefully your pitch is so compelling that they ask you follow-up questions! Make sure you have a business card on hand to give them in case they want to learn more.

Here are some tips to consider as you practice your pitch in the mirror and to your dog, cat and best friend before you take it out into the real world:

  • It should explain what you do, clearly and succinctly: Who are you? What do you do?
  • It should be no longer than 20-30 seconds, which is about the time it takes to ride an elevator.
  • The pitch should be addressed to THEM not to YOU. To successfully engage in conversation, remember it’s about storytelling, not fact-reciting.
  • It should be comprehensible to even a kid.
  • Say it with confidence.
  • Be memorable.
  • It needs to be compelling and sound natural in person. (It’s beneficial to write it out and memorize it, but you don’t want to end up sounding like a robot.)

Why is your elevator pitch important?

  • You want people to understand what you do and remember you. It’s an opportunity to create a mental picture for your audience when your work is not in front of them to experience first hand.
  • You are creating an opportunity for an opportunity, which getting tongue tied will not provide you.
  • In a social setting, you would like to be able to engage in meaningful dialog with someone without rambling.
  • You want to add value to your community.
  • Because it’s an opportunity to represent your character as well as what kind of work you do.
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Good luck! Let us know what your success stories are after you’ve written out and practiced your pitch!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Your Unique Story: tips for figuring it out and getting it out there

Happy September!
Whether it's back to school time for you or not, this time of year never-the-less makes it feel like it's time for a fresh start. We are feeling it, and are excited to dive in with you and help you refresh your story and your materials. This month we'll be sharing advice and ideas on how to hone in on how you tell your story, both in writing and verbally. Once you have that down, you'll find that it'll be easier to pursue and get opportunities and reach your goals!

Fact: you are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way. As artists and creatives, we all occupy so many different roles in our lives that sometimes we need a boost in seeing the big picture. We need to assure that we stand out in our vibrant, saturated, creative communities. So, how do you let your audience know who you are, tell your story in a compelling way, and genuinely show that your artwork or creative products are so incredibly unique? We’ll cover a step-by-step process below.

Sharing your unique story in a professional, genuine way is undoubtedly important because potential customers and patrons want to know who you are and where you come from; it gives them confidence to know about you, makes them comfortable and interested, and they can connect with you and your work in a profound way. Your story is part of your identity, whether that’s a brand identity for your product or who you are as an artist.

By confidently conveying your professional creative self, you will be able to reach several goals that come along with having a strong story and identity:

  • You will sell work. If there’s a strong story behind your work, it’s going to be a lot easier for people to hold on to it, remember it, and want it.
  • People will be more inclined to follow you on social media if they can connect with you and recognize themselves in your story. You want to form a bond with your audience and the best way to do that is by sharing.
  • With your story loud and clear on your website, people will feel comfortable reaching out to you for commissions, purchases, or to collaborate on projects.

The first step in feeling confident in telling your unique story is to set aside quality time to write. Set aside one uninterrupted hour on a timer and answer these questions:

  • Who are you and how do you want to be defined? For example, you might work a day job as an accountant, but make jewelry in your spare time, with the hopes of eventually launching a jewelry business. So you would state that you are indeed a jewelry maker.
  • Write out your professional bio as a creative. Look back at the work you’ve made, where you’ve showed it, who has purchased it, and any press you’ve received and sing your own praises. Just starting out? Don’t worry about it. Definitely touch on any education, workshops, and experiences you have along with your passion for the work.
  • Write out a detailed description of your work or project. What does it look like, how is it made, what kind of materials do you use, what does it feel like? Be as specific as possible.
  • What is the inspiration behind your work? This can be anything and everything, don’t hold back.

Next, after a short break, read over what you’ve written and highlight the parts that are unique to you. Make a separate list of these unique traits and translate these facts into a written story about yourself in the first-person. For example, you might have started out by describing yourself as a jewelry maker (of which there are thousands), but now you are able to describe yourself as a jewelry maker who uses brass fittings and rope from the hardware store to make bold, sculptural statement necklaces inspired by your life growing up on the New England coast helping your grandfather repair his boats. It’s pretty likely that no one else can claim that exact story, and this specificity will make your audience want to learn and see more.

The added bonus of adding specific details to your story is that they can also help shape your logo and the look of your website if you are getting ready to launch an online store. The jewelry maker in the above example might be inspired to incorporate nautical elements into her logo or decide that she wants all the product photography to be taken on a weathered dock to reference her story.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Stand out by defining your visual style.

This post is updated and adapted from one originally posted on February 24, 2015. 

Fact: you are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way.

As artists and creatives, we all occupy so many different roles in our lives that sometimes we need a boost in seeing the big picture. We need to assure that we stand out in this vibrant, saturated, creative world. So, how do you let your audience know who you are, tell your story in a compelling way, and genuinely show that your art work or creative product and services are so incredibly unique? Sharing your story with words and visuals that support your work are the best way to stand out, but how?

Here are three steps to get you started:

 Collect images with colors that appeal to you to help you create a new color palette.

Collect images with colors that appeal to you to help you create a new color palette.

1. Write a list of words and phrases that describe: 
a) the actual work you make or do
b) your personal professional history
c) the motivation behind your work.
We guarantee that the more specific you get, the more exciting your story will become. These words serve as the framework for writing your statement and pitch, but can also be used to shape the visual support for your story. For example, if you describe your work as geometric, vibrant and strong, those words provide a guide for the kind of colors, typefaces and layouts you might want to consider for your website. 

2. Research your competition. Have fun making a giant spreadsheet of who else does work similar to yours. And remember, you and they are inherently unique. So the question to ask yourself when you are looking around is: "How am I different?"

3. Collect visuals. Words are your tool to telling your story in person and on your website, but don't forget about the visuals! What kind of materials, processes, and inspiration do you use to do what you do? Document all of these in a beautiful way–for example, if you are a printmaker, create a video that shows your process! Another helpful way to start developing a visual story is by creating mood boards that reflect how you want to represent your work, the kinds of color palettes you like, the typefaces you are drawn to, and anything else that inspires you visually. You can organize your boards into categories and start developing your personal visual style that will help support your story and your work and make you stand out from the crowd!

Good luck! Be in touch with us if you need an expert team by your side in helping you create the powerful visual and written story behind the work you do! 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

It takes a village. We're cultivating a community through DELVE.

You might be incredibly social or like to keep to yourself, or maybe you’ve been in your field for over 25 years or you're just starting out, but still there are multiple times a week when you might feel alone, frustrated or stuck when it comes to your artistic or creative practice. Why? Probably because you are trying to juggle 3,000 things in addition to your creative work. If you’re reading this, you are a talented person who is filtering the world through your creative lens to make your work, in addition to possibly managing other jobs, family, and life stuff... PLUS you also know (maybe just at the back of your mind) that you need to market and communicate your work in a kick-ass manner in order to get the opportunities you want. It’s a tall order, and you’re smart and up for the challenge, but it can be really, really hard.

Well, good news: we are launching the GROUP DELVE TOOLKIT!
Why should you care? Good question.
Here’s why:

  • The Group DELVE Toolkit is a series of online classes for artists and creatives that will help you get better at writing and talking about your work, and will cover all of the nuts and bolts of all of the marketing stuff that feels really hard and not genuine.
  • The classes will be curated and small so you’ll still get personal attention.
  • Small classes means support from your peers, and cultivating these relationships will be built into the classes.
  • The Group DELVE Toolkit is AFFORDABLE! We aren’t multimillionaires selling you an impersonal system. We are two successful women who are artists and creative entrepreneurs and have worked with incredibly talented people to help them succeed. You know you need to invest to succeed, but we don’t want to make that option too hard.
 

Do you want access to a discount to the Group DELVE Toolkit before it launches to the public? Take this short survey!

 

We feel and have felt stuck a lot, too, and that was a huge motivating factor for us to start DELVE.  It is due to the amazing community we’ve cultivated, and the hard work that we’ve put in, that we are now in the position to help you achieve your goals: by helping you clearly articulate what you do–online, in person and in writing–in order to get the opportunities you want, and therefore the life you want to have.

If you're reading our blog for the first time or you’re a familiar friend, we wanted to take a step back and share who we are and how you can be part of the community of artists and creatives we are cultivating in person and online so that running your day-to-day business (artists, you are small business owners, too) can be inspiring and in line with making your work.

First, a little backstory. We, Sara and Andrea, are both visual artists and started our creative agency, Kind Aesthetic, as a way to offer artists and creative small businesses genuine storytelling, visual branding and beautiful, effective websites to push their businesses to the next level.  Any clients who have worked with us know that it's more than just getting a "brand." We can't help you without digging in deeper and uncovering what makes your work uniquely yours and why you are the best at it. We ask a lot of challenging questions, but we support you, hold you accountable, and refresh how you communicate your work to an ideal client as well as to yourself.

It’s because of this creative agency work that DELVE came about, which is an educational and coaching platform for artists and creatives who want to hone their own professional skills and how they communicate their work. In other words, we help guide you in creating your unique story, marketing plan and personal brand. DELVE started as a series of in-person networking events around New York City where amazing speakers shared their paths about how they achieved their professional successes, and has since branched into workshops and our popular 1:1 DELVE Toolkit, a coaching platform for individuals.

We understand that there are a lot of people advertising classes and online marketing solutions to you. Our services come from a very genuine place because we have had the same struggles and have been offered the same options. We are confident that what we do differently is:

  • We communicate very clearly that working with us is not an “easy fix.” We don’t find galleries for artists or tell small business owners where to find their next paying clients. We aren’t magic unicorns. But we do help you define your unique story so that your ideal audience and clients can find you. And when they do find you, they will be very impressed.
  • We listen and we care and we ask a lot of questions. We are two very kind and honest individuals who won’t work with you if it’s not the right fit. We care about your success and don’t want you to waste your money.
  • We won’t waste your time. We show up, you show up, and together, through wonderful conversations and some incredible work, we will help you. And, dare we say, it might even be fun and will make you feel good, confident, and excited about your work.

We hope that if you're interested in some amazing online classes specifically for fine artists in all disciplines, and also all kinds of creative entrepreneurs, you'll fill out this quick survey so we can offer you the classes you want at the times you want. Our thanks will come in the form of a discount! Cheers!

 

 

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

RECAP of DELVE Webinar: Verbalizing Your Practice

We held our first free DELVE Webinar on November 2nd! We are happy that so many of you were able to join Andrea for the opportunity to get focused on how you talk about what you do.

For those of you who missed it, you can see the entirety of the webinar in the video below, technical difficulties and all! Since the slides didn't advance during the webinar feel free to download them here. We'll get it right for the next webinar.... and stay tuned for the next one. Sign up for our mailing list to be the first to know about it!

Join Andrea from Kind Aesthetic for a free webinar for artists and creative entrepreneurs that offers actionable steps to help you find the best way to explain what you do clearly, concisely and confidently.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Kind Aesthetic on the Freelancers Union Blog!

We're honored to have contributed to the Freelancers Union blog. It's an amazing resource for anyone looking for professional guidance, inspiration, and especially to connect with other people in your field. Check out our two posts below!

5 tips for telling your story to potential clients

Make people remember you with a unique elevator pitch

Image courtesy of the Freelancers Union.

You are the only freelancer in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way.

So how do you let your potential clients know who you are and what you do in a way that feels powerful and genuine? How do you recount your professional history and products and services in a compelling way when your work isn’t there to visually speak for you?

Here are five tips for telling your story, read on here....

Image courtesy of the Freelancers Union

Have you ever felt tongue-tied when asked to introduce yourself and describe your work? Or maybe you ramble on in a way that doesn’t accurately describe what you do?

As a creative who does so many amazing things, it might be incredibly difficult to put your work into words in order to give your audience that “aha” moment and make them want to learn more. Read on here...

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

How do you stand out as a professional artist or creative?

Fact: you are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way.

As artists and creatives, we all occupy so many different roles in our lives that sometimes we need a boost in seeing the big picture. We need to assure that we stand out in our vibrant, saturated, creative communities. So, how do you let your audience know who you are, tell your story in a compelling way, and genuinely show that your art work or creative product and services are so incredibly unique? Sharing your unique story and/or mission statement will give you the tools to stand out from the crowd.

Here are three steps to get you in the right mindset:

1. Write a list of words and phrases that describe: 
a) the actual work you make or do
b) the your personal professional history, and
c) the motivation behind your work.
We guarantee that the more specific you get, the more exciting your story will become.

2. Research your competition. Have fun making a giant spreadsheet of who else does work similar to yours. And remember, you and them are inherently unique. So the question to ask yourself when you are looking around is: "How am I different?"

3. Collect visuals. Words are your tool to telling your story in person and on your website, but don't forget about the visuals! What kind of materials, processes, and inspiration do you use to do what you do? Document all of these in a beautiful way, create mood boards that reflect how you want to represent your work, and then take it from there!

Good luck! Be in touch with us if you need an expert team by your side in helping you create the powerful visual and written story behind the work you do! 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

How can you stand out from the crowd as an artist or creative?

During our DELVE Workshops or while working with clients one-on-one with our DELVE Toolkit, we often run into amazing people who are frustrated with answering the question "What do you do?" in social, high-pressure situations. As artists and creatives, we all occupy so many different roles in our lives, and sometimes we all need a little boost in seeing the big picture and allowing ourselves to stand out in our vibrant, saturated, creative communities. So we wanted to share a small example of an artist who stood out from the crowd.


We met an artist at an art opening. She had recently moved to New York from Florida, so we were talking about that, since it's a big life move. Sarah, my new acquaintance, impressed me when I asked her, "What kind of work do you make?" And she answered, "I am a sculptor who makes works from recycled materials, especially those small plastic bags that newspapers are delivered in." Immediately, I was intrigued, asked her more questions about her work, and made it a point to look at her website the next day. Turns out her work is very cool and had she just said, "I am a sculptor" the conversation might have drifted off to more social things, or perhaps ended. So, the point here, ladies and gents, is to be specific because each and everyone of us is incredibly unique. Make someone remember you. 

If you might want some assistance talking about what you do and need some perspective, a kick in the pants, or some help with organizing your creative endeavors, we can help with the DELVE Toolkit. Just email us and we can set up your free 20-minute call. 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Talking about your work with family

If any of you have ever taken a DELVE Workshop, you know that we like to emphasize that telling your unique story as an artist or creative is one of the most important things you can practice. And from leading the DELVE Workshops, we understand that for most of you, speaking in public about your work is one of your least favorite things to do. But you do it anyway, because clearly talking about what you do can open up new doors and opportunities!

But now comes the time of year when we all see family and friends and are constantly asked: "Now tell me, you unique artist, you, what are you up to these days?" Joy.

Family.jpg

Whether it's your Chardonnay-infused aunt, your inquisitive niece, your intimidatingly successful cousin, or your probing mother, your pitch about your art work or creative business should be clear and make sense. So, when you have 30 minutes of travel time get these three things in order and you should be prepared for even the most awkward of family encounters:

1) Visuals. Have some images of your work at the ready on your phone or tablet that you carry with you. Showing what you do is a lot easier and may prevent you from going on a long winded conceptual rant.

2) Answer these three questions for yourself: What does my work look like? What is my work about? How do I make my work? Jot down the answers to these questions as if in conversation, memorize some good lines and have them ready.

3) Be casual, be passionate, be light. Though your work can give you existential worries, or your creative business clients are keeping you up at night, set that aside as best you can and concentrate on your past accomplishments this year, upcoming events and future goals. This will give you the opportunity to reflect on all you've done and have some handy examples at the ready if anyone wants to know.

Happy Holidays, everyone! Don't forget our DELVE Toolkit sale is going strong through 12/31. Be sure to take advantage of it!

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Share your unique story! on Art Business Institute's Blog

We're so pleased to have been asked to write a piece for the Art Business Institute (ABI) called Get the opportunities you want! Share Your Unique Story. 

"Fact: you are the only person in the world who does exactly what you do in your unique way." This article outlines some approaches to figuring out how you stand out from the crowd as an artist, maker, creative, retailer, and more. The first step in getting there is setting aside some quality time to write. Check out the piece here to read more, get inspired, and take some actionable steps to success!

Also, ABI is hosting a really unique workshop opportunity for all of you artists and makers out there. This September they will be hosting ART + BUSINESS NYC: A Workshop for Artists and Craftspeople on September 27-28, 2014 at A.R.T./New York in Manhattan. If you are thinking of bringing your career to the next level by learning how your work can translate to selling wholesale, getting new opportunities, and more, this is your jam. It's open for any kind of artist or maker, so be sure to secure your ticket soon; it's a very worthy small investment! (There are some amazing speakers, and we'll be on a panel as well! Come see us.)

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.