Creative Time

3 Instagram Feeds We Love Right Now

Looking for some new feeds to follow on Instagram to inspire you? Here are some of our favorites. Enjoy.


Evi Abeler makes gorgeous food photographs. Think subtly, light, and such a gorgeous color palette.

We love the feed of Inklines, drawings by Brooklyn-based artist, Michael Arthur. Everyday he posts amazing work from his life, drawings of musicians and performers and more. 

Sight Unseen is an online magazine about process and inspiration in design and the visual arts. Need we say more? 

Creative Time's Instagram feed is always chock full of their projects, such a good way to keep track of what they are up to. 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

4 examples of how community and art can be a powerful team

We are very interested in projects that promote positive social change and experiences while preserving artistic integrity. It is the job and vision of artists and curators to bring issues, perspectives, and conversations out into the world, and to us it's incredibly important not to dumb down or desaturate art work in a community or public space, since doing so is what can give "community art" a bad rep. Below are four examples of organizations and projects that do good, inspire, and preserve the power of artists in our world.

The organization Creative Time is very important to us. Over the past four decades, they have dedicated their projects to expressing artists' intentions in public space. Back in 2008, Andrea volunteered at the exhibition, Democracy in America, at the Park Avenue Armory. The 2008 election was of enormous importance in our minds, and not only was there a huge exhibition dedicated to the perspectives of that time in our history, but Creative Time also brought artists to the DNC and RNC, and set up mobile projects that explored what democracy means in America. Just exploring their entire archive is inspiring, and we are especially excited for the Kara Walker exhibition at the Domino Sugar Factory opening May 10th.

 "Some 400 women and a few men–all selected to represent a cross-section of ages, backgrounds, and perspectives–gathered on the stoops along Park Place, a residential block in Brooklyn, where they engaged in unscripted conversations about a variety of issues related to gender politics today. Thousands of members of the public came out to wander among the groups, listen to what they were saying, and form their own opinions."   -From Creative Time's website.  Between the door and the street  by Suzanne Lacy from 2013.

 "Some 400 women and a few men–all selected to represent a cross-section of ages, backgrounds, and perspectives–gathered on the stoops along Park Place, a residential block in Brooklyn, where they engaged in unscripted conversations about a variety of issues related to gender politics today. Thousands of members of the public came out to wander among the groups, listen to what they were saying, and form their own opinions." 

-From Creative Time's website. Between the door and the street by Suzanne Lacy from 2013.

As members of the steering committee for our local nonprofit community organization, Arts Gowanus, we are hyper-aware of artists' (our) roles in the community, which are particularly important when we have studios in gentrifying neighborhoods. We loved this recap of The Studio In Crisis meeting by William Powhida from April 4th because of the call to action at the end for all artists to be part of the larger community conversation. Artists working in affordable studios do not have to have a passive experience in the community, but should have an engaged, productive one!

This article in the World Economic Forum asks if art could change the world. It provides a great example of the Canadian Brandaid project, which connects artisans in developing countries with brands, and therefore new customers, to make their beautiful craft work. It is more commercial in nature than other examples we are citing, but incredibly relevant since educated consumers can bring about change in an important way.

The Percent for Art Program has existed for thirty years, and runs on a New York City law that requires that one percent of the budget for eligible New York City-funded construction projects be spent on public artwork. Their Tumblr is an amazing resource of artwork existing in public space, some posts with commentary from the artists. We love this commission below by Natasha Johns-Messenger whose piece, Alterview, "frames the East River view for students and staff at the Hunter's Point Campus in Queens, capturing scenes of the ever-changing cityscape through the orange glass panel and its lens-like cutout."  You can read more about the new facility – which houses three public schools serving over 1,000 students–in Architectural Record

Images courtesy of   Natasha Johns-Messenger  and Architectural Record. From the  Percent for Art site .

Images courtesy of  Natasha Johns-Messenger and Architectural Record. From the Percent for Art site.

In this thought-provoking article from last year, Sara Reisman, the head curator from Percent for Art, examines art's social function through examples of her program and beyond. Her final sentiment is one that we want to share with you:

"...There have been significant institutional shifts in the visual arts community, where there are a number of new social practice MFA programs (Portland State UniversityCalifornia College of the Arts and Queens College, which recently established a social practice program in collaboration with the Queens Museum of Art). A Blade of Grass Foundation was established two years ago to support 'artists who demonstrate artistic excellence and serve as innovative conduits for social change.' And Creative Time continues to program its annual summit, which convenes an international roster of artists and cultural producers whose work exemplifies public practice that enacts social change. All of these shifts in institutional thinking point to an increased value placed on artists and others working in the arts as facilitators of social and political change. I question who is leading this move, artists or institutions, and is it a function of functional art being more fundable? Either way, I am a believer, even if conflicted. I believe in this seemingly imaginary space of art where political and social concerns can be addressed without censorship, and I am hopeful that social practice will seep further into other fields and discourses — in other words, the real world — so that free expression can be upheld beyond the space of art."

 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Friday Links- November 1

Happy November! Welcome to our weekly round-up of things we found interesting and noteworthy during the week. Find it here every Friday.

Remembering Lou Reed with his music.

Five Alive with Kara Smith on our blog.

In the studio with artist Danielle Mysliwiec on District Color.  

A post about creating and making work and progress in 1949 on Brain Pickings.  

A look into the Sochi Project in Russia, before the winter 2014 Olympics. 

We loved this piece that was shown at the ultra-inspiting Creative Time Summit last weekend: The Bullitts- Close your Eyes featuring Story Board P.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Friday Links- October 18 and October 24

Welcome to  our weekly round-up of things we found interesting and noteworthy during the week. Find it here every Friday. 

We were busy last Friday preparing for Gowanus Open Studios! Here are articles from the L Magazine,  Hyperallergic, and Curious Matter

Some great artists explore their first jobs.  

Here is a gigantic list of residencies in North America! 

Some action on our Kind Aesthetic blog: Five Alive Interviews with Andrea Evans and Kirk Snow and Gyun Hur. Plus a great interview with NRI's Lindsay Maiorana. 

 A look into Felix Gonzalez Torres' work and how an artist statement can influence your frame of reference. 

A film fest in Coppenhagen curated by Ai Wei Wei.  

Some inspiring photo book reviews.  

A look into the whole Banksy residency in NYC.  

The Creative Time Summit is today and tomorrow!  We will be sharing thoughts and info throughout the weekend.

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.

Friday Links- October 11

Welcome to  our weekly round-up of things we found interesting and noteworthy during the week. Find it here every Friday.

3rd Ward in Bushwick, Brooklyn unexpectedly closed this past week. Many many people are sad and angered by it, but Brokelyn helps break it down and offers some advice and solutions. 

An amazing article by David Byrne, a precursor to Creative Time's Summit head.  

Read about our Creative Marketing Workshop at Cue Art Foundation. 

We were in Boston over the past week thinking about opportunities and the art scene there. Big Red and Shiny lets us know about a submission and some thoughts on the city.

Studio Shelf's pop-up design office in public space in Cape Town is a great idea.  

The Art of Letter Writing all in one site. 

 This is an insightful review of the Chris Burden show at the New Museum.

A look into Sass Brown's book and upcycling and its role in fashion. 

© 2017 Kind Aesthetic, All Rights Reserved.