Jesse Chun, Landscape #1, Archival Inkjet Print, 43 x 36 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #1, Archival Inkjet Print, 43 x 36 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #8, Archival Inkjet Print, 20 x 30 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #8, Archival Inkjet Print, 20 x 30 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #7, Archival Inkjet Print, 32 x 55 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #7, Archival Inkjet Print, 32 x 55 inches

Jesse Chun, Landscape #3 (diptych), Archival Inkjet Print, 22 x 22 inches each   

Jesse Chun, Landscape #3 (diptych), Archival Inkjet Print, 22 x 22 inches each 
 

 

These landscapes are from my series titled "On Paper". In this body of work, I employ methods of appropriation, digital manipulation and photographic scanning to transform the background watermark images of passport pages into large-scale landscapes. I remove the traveler’s personal data and re-frame the pictorial element of the pages. In this process, the images that exist on the pages to prevent identity theft are recontextualized into large-scale landscapes of unbound nature. 

Drawing from my own transcultural experience as a nomad/immigrant, I explore notions of identity in context of mobility and information.I decontextualize bureaucratic information from their original functionality and power, to reveal metaphors of identity and transit. My work reveals the ideology, interrogation, displacement, and dreams that become a part of who we are.                                                                         —Jesse Chun

 

 

Erratics are large boulders that were left behind by glaciers. This video – an attempt to "explain" and visualize this phenomenon – is a part of Visitor Center for Erratic Monuments, a project dedicated to the interpretation of some such peculiar rocks found along sidewalks in Brooklyn and to the reorganization of the city through traces of its natural history. Through photographs, a staffed information desk, a video kiosk, souvenir postcards, and take-away maps, the center offers visitors a chance to explore the neighborhood landscape both geologically and otherwise.                                               

                                                                                                                                                                                                —Katarina Jerinic

 
Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0043), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0043), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0072), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0072), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0062), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0062), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0328), 2014    

Katie Westmoreland, Trail Markers Project (Image ID: 0328), 2014    

I use found and created light filtration systems to make images that exist autonomously from myself as artist. Each project is guided by a system of curiosity, experimentation, and play. From the initial experience of viewing filtered light, I consider elements of the visual and sensorial experience such as ambient visual temperature, materials involved in the filtration system, and the geographical, contextual, and cultural aspects of place. These considerations inform the way in which I make each artwork. The methods of creation vary greatly between each piece; however, foundations of painting and analogue photography influence the way in which each filtered light situation is handled.

I frequently happen upon dynamic light circumstances when I am going on long runs through my neighborhood and hiking in the mountains. The places traversed by my feet are the places I know most intimately. My understanding of a place is highly influenced by the quality of light observed and experienced.

When I hike in Cold Spring, New York, I use chalk paint to transcribe the sunlight as it sifts through the leaves and branches and onto boulders and escarpments that function as two-dimensional painting surfaces. (The chalk paint is handmade and abides by “leave-no-trace” hiking principles.) As it shines through the trees, the sunlight casts images that could extend indefinitely, but are caught by the rock surfaces - each with modulations and unique surface characteristics that affect the registration of the filtered light. Often the paintings overlap and interact with rock sculptures left by other hikers and permanent, directional paint marks left intentionally as hiking guides. The paintings are documented with a photograph and erased naturally by wind and rain. The Trail Markers Project is an ongoing project that began July 2013. 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                —Katie Westmoreland
 

 

Sarah G. Sharp, Swimmers, 2013, 18” x 22”, found images on paper.

Sarah G. Sharp, Westward, 2013, 18” x 22”, found images on paper.

Sarah G. Sharp, Ama Sits in Silent Meditation, 2014, 14” x 17”, found image and embroidery thread on paper.

The Youth Communes and the Pacific States is a series of collages made from images of communes and idealized nature on the west coast of the United States found in popular print media like Time and Life magazines. Most of the source images were originally published in the 1960’s-1970’s and represent mass media’s attempt to frame and reproduce utopian subcultures for American society at large. As I engage with these images I seek to disrupt the frameworks produced by the media.   —Sarah G. Sharp

 
 

Brad Thiele, point to point navigation from ‘re-visions’ series, 9.25”h x 6.25”w x .75”d, pencil on 273 pages within used book

 
 
I’ve become so accustomed to not reading that I don’t even read what appears before my eyes. It’s not easy: they teach us to read as children, and for the rest of our lives we remain the slaves of all the written stuff they fling in front of us. I may have had to make some effort myself, at first, to learn not to read, but now it comes quite naturally to me. The secret is not refusing to look at the written words. On the contrary, you must look at them, intensely, until they disappear.
— passage from If on a winter's night a traveler by Italo Calvino
 

Prompted by this quote, used books are sought after for titles understood as actions to perform throughout the books’ contents. In ‘point to point navigation,’ every sentence-ending punctuation on a given page in Gore Vidal’s Point to Point Navigation is connected to one another, resulting in 273 pages of unique connective drawings. And much like the character quoted above, the books within the ‘re-visions’ series are not read, but instead diligently combed through multiple times for the information specific only to the given directive, such as the punctuation noted above.

These re-visions both challenge and enrich the chain of collaboration between author/ publisher, the hands of previous reader/ owners, my reformattings and future viewers, encouraging alternative understandings newly expressed as concepts in collection, time, investment, drawing and play.

**And as a note of documented ‘navigation’ and coincidental timing, during the course of its  completion, ‘point to point navigation’ traveled throughout New York City, on a flight to Germany, on an overnight train to Italy with a week’s stay in Venice, and a path retraced back to New York City.**    

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          —Brad Thiele

 
J Carpenter, greenwich, 7:16, embroidery on paper, 8" x 10", 2011 Greenwich, 7:16 portrays the bricks of Greenwich St., as viewed from my speeding, bumping, jostling bicycle. All human figures are removed from the composition, creating mystery and allowing viewers to superimpose their own ideas and memories of travel upon the scene.

J Carpenter, greenwich, 7:16, embroidery on paper, 8" x 10", 2011

Greenwich, 7:16 portrays the bricks of Greenwich St., as viewed from my speeding, bumping, jostling bicycle. All human figures are removed from the composition, creating mystery and allowing viewers to superimpose their own ideas and memories of travel upon the scene.

J Carpenter, light glitches, embroidery on paper, 12" x 16", 2013 Light glitches portrays the experience of a surprising moment of feeling present during a harried trip through the city. I often find, when I am at my most frantic and frustrated, while hurriedly running errands via subway, I will have an "ah-hah!" moment of peace, calm, and understanding. The circle, a Buddhist symbol of enlightenment, is superimposed on a brick wall, representing a moment of clarity in a surprising location. 

J Carpenter, light glitches, embroidery on paper, 12" x 16", 2013

Light glitches portrays the experience of a surprising moment of feeling present during a harried trip through the city. I often find, when I am at my most frantic and frustrated, while hurriedly running errands via subway, I will have an "ah-hah!" moment of peace, calm, and understanding. The circle, a Buddhist symbol of enlightenment, is superimposed on a brick wall, representing a moment of clarity in a surprising location. 

J Carpenter,  the cadence of days, embroidery on dendrite, 40' x 2', 2013

J Carpenter,  the cadence of days, embroidery on dendrite, 40' x 2', 2013

J Carpenter,  the cadence of days (detail), embroidery on dendrite, 40' x 2', 2013

J Carpenter,  the cadence of days (detail)embroidery on dendrite, 40' x 2', 2013

The cadence of days, a site-specific embroidery on transparent paper, represents the moldings at the rooftops of approximately 30 New York City homes. The piece wraps around the entire gallery, recreating a city block by representing only the block's uppermost outline. The embroidery lends a sensitivity and intimacy to the representation of people's homes, and the vast amount of blank space in the gallery lends a quiet, airy, meditative quality. The noise and clutter of a city block have been omitted, leaving a soft, human touch and room to breathe and experience this humanness.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  —J Carpenter    

 
 

I work sculpturally to capture a moment in time using active processes that become meditations: indigo dyeing, weaving, wrapping, compressing, structuring, ordering, and releasing. The repetition of these acts fosters a connection between the subconscious mind and the body, and these full body rhythmic movements allow my stream of consciousness to expand on certain conceptual ideas and develop more thoughtful conclusions. 

My work is on the continuum of dialogue between the grid and its manifestations as form, content, and medium through threads, weaving, and painting.  I utilize the power of the materials to construct architectural frames from which to build weighted objects in space.  Localized patterns of organization translate unique spatial and physical relationships between the viewer and the sculptures.  Parts of a sculpture can be compact and highly detailed, whereas others are unraveled and cascade onto the floor. Many can be installed in multiple configurations, hung from the wall or ceiling, allowing for multiple vantage points for the viewer to engage with two or three structural planes.  I respond to the inherent energy of the materials and how they interact and form my decisions, balancing the tension between my control and relinquishment of control through the process.

Experiencing the work reveals the materiality and inherent makeup of the natural fibers like cotton, jute, and wool.  Washes of indigo blues and bright pinks highlight the texture and dimensionality of a pebbled knot or stitch and transform a canvassed piece at large.  The visceral experience of the work conveys a message of beauty and form that exemplifies my interpretation of the grid.

                                                                                                                   —Liz Robb

 

 

Things Merging and Falling Apart, 2010-2014, consists of unique type C contact prints (photograms or rayograms) created in a color darkroom using long exposures.

My interest in cameraless photography came from a desire to capture not a decisive moment, but a time lapse, a movement or transformation of fragile organic objects caught on a light-sensitive surface. One of my inspirations was to watch the making of precious sand mandalas that take days of intense labor and, once completed, are destroyed without any regrets as a symbol of impermanence. Essentially, even the sharpest, most beautifully composed glossy image fails to represent reality because it’s trying to hold on to something that’s impossible to grasp.

I started off working with recognizable objects that after long darkroom manipulations often would turn out looking completely abstract yet more appealing to me; physically acting on paper surface, they became tangible imprints of ephemeral emotional states. At some point, I realized that it’s more of a collaboration between me and my subjects since they became active participants in this process. Instead of imitating the illumination and depicting formal qualities, these images challenge the expectations and capture the light itself; they bring viewers’ attention to the performative nature of creative process and elaborate on chance effects and intuitive states of being.  

                                                       —Tatiana Gulenkina



Bios

J Carpenter received her BA at Rutgers University in 2002. A painter at the time, she exhibited and participated in multiple residencies with Gaia Studio, Hoboken, NJ. During her time at Gaia, J began incorporating embroidery and other needlework into her paintings. She received a NJ Council on the Arts fellowship in 2009. She went on to study with the Lost Art Lacers Guild of NJ and Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop. These studies allowed J to create sculptures, installations, collographs, and embossings, all utilizing lacemaking and embroidery. J completed a Swing Space residency with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council in 2010. She has exhibited in group shows at locations such as the DUMBO Arts Festival and the Bushwick Print Lab, as well as in a solo show at Taller Boricua Gallery in Manhattan.

Jesse Chun is a New York based visual artist. Her work investigates notions of home in context of place, identity and mobility. Chun has exhibited nationwide in New York, L.A, Miami, Portland and internationally in Seoul, Toronto, Hong Kong and Istanbul. She received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts and BFA from Parsons the New School for Design. She has also been a guest speaker at New York University, Columbia University, Parsons the New School for Design and School of Visual Arts. Select reviews include The Korea Times, Asia Literary Review and Wen Wei Po (HK).

Tatiana Gulenkina is a Russian-born photographer and visual artist. She graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2011, and since then has been pursuing a career in fine arts. She uses both digital technology and traditional darkroom equipment, as well as video and mixed media.Her work has been featured in the British Journal of Photography, The Week, Wired, F-Stop Magazine, NPR, Beautiful/Decay, Conscientious, and other publications. In 2014, she was named one of the 30 Under 30 Women Photographers by Photo Boîte Agency and 30 Photographers Under 30 to Watch by Complex Magazine. 

Katarina Jerinic’s photography, mixed-media work and public space-based installations respond to and intervene in built environments in order to draw attention to our interactions with surrounding spaces. Jerinic has been a resident at MacDowell Colony, Peterborough, NH; the Center for Book Arts, New York, NY; and the Experimental Television Center, Owego, NY and participated in the Bronx Museum of the Arts Artist in the Marketplace program. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY; Queens Museum of Art, Queens, NY; Proteus Gowanus, Brooklyn, NY; NurtureArt, Brooklyn, NY; BRIC, Brooklyn, NY; the Conflux Festival, New York, NY; Temple Gallery at Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, PA, among others. Jerinic’s collaborative project with Naomi Miller, The Work Office (TWO), has been awarded grants from the Black Rock Arts Foundation, the Brooklyn Arts Council, Chashama, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Swing Space, and the Times Square Alliance. She received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts and BA from American University in history. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY

Liz Robb started her career as a fashion designer, beginning in New York City and eventually moving to Madison, Wisconsin to work as a woman’s sweater and knit designer. While volunteering on a farm in Wisconsin, she learned how to care for sheep, harvest their fleece, and create beautiful roving and yarn.  It opened her eyes to new career opportunities and possibilities, which led her to leave her corporate design job, obtain a master’s degree in fibers, and create a new life as an artist. Now working out of her studio in the Dogpatch neighborhood of San Francisco, Liz is working sculpturally to create textured surfaces and forms with natural materials such as cotton, wool, beeswax, and indigo.

Sarah G. Sharp is an artist with a research-based practice whose interests include alternative social histories, language, place, intuitive processes and craft. She is the recipient of a Getty Library Research Grant and a BRIC Arts Media Fellowship. Exhibitions include The Aldrich Museum, CT, The Hampden Gallery at UMass Amherst, Frederieke Taylor Gallery and Stephan Stoyanov Gallery, NY. Sarah is the co-founder of Cohort artist’s collective. She holds an MFA and an MA from Purchase College and is faculty in the Art Practice MFA Program at School of Visual Arts in New York. She lives and works in Brooklyn.  

Brad Thiele avidly reformats everyday language and common materials through conceptual language play, purposeful misunderstanding, process-based execution and deadpan humor. In his work, Brad highlights language’s drastically absurd to subtly poetic spectrum, encouraging us to redefine our most basic, yet intimate relationship with language and the world around us. Brad received his MFA from California State University, Chico, including a year studying at die Akademie für Bildende Künste in Mainz, Germany. He has exhibited in California, the Midwest, Germany and New York City, and has recently been awarded an artist residency at The Center for Book Arts, New York, NY. He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Katie Westmoreland's light-based work began in Austin, Texas, where the skies are expansive and the sun shines for long hours. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art from The University of Texas, Austin and attended Columbia University’s Advance Summer Painting Intensive in 2012. When she moved to New York City in 2013, her studio practice dramatically evolved in response to a completely different quality of light. As she began to explore all the expansive hiking trails New York State offers, her paintings transferred from stretched cotton hung on walls to rock facades and boulders. Katie currently live and work in Sunset Park, Brooklyn and will spend Spring 2015 studying the light and hiking in El, Bruc, Barcelona for a residency at Can Serrat. 

The KA Quarterly is an online visual journal that comes out four times a year and coincides with the season. It reflects the current state of our inspirations and unites the work of artists, musicians and/or designers under a common topic or theme.